Behavior Interventions - Generalization Interventions: The student needs help doing the behavior in a new setting, time or manner

 

Social Competence Intervention (SCI)

SCI is a social competence intervention developed by Stichter et al. (2010) that combines both cognitive-behavioral and applied behavior analysis principals within a group-based structure. Specifically, the intervention is designed to enhance the social competence needs of elementary, middle school, and high school youth with social skill deficits. Each version provides structure, consistency, and scaffolding for three specific age ranges (Elementary: 6-10; Adolescent: 11-14; High School: 14-18) to assist in skill acquisition and maintenance. It is best used for the HFA population, and others who exhibit similar social skills deficits. This intervention is structured with scaffolded instruction in the following targeted social skills units: recognizing facial expressions, sharing ideas using the appropriate speaker and listener skills, turn taking in conversations, understanding feelings and emotions, and problem solving.

EBI Brief for the Social Competence Intervention (SCI)

SCI Website with information and resources: education.missouri.edu/sci

CW-FIT

CW-FIT is a behavioral intervention designed to explicitly teach and reinforce appropriate social behaviors through the use of a game like activity that can be implemented within the general education classroom setting. This intervention can be strategically implemented during “problem” times of the day to decrease problem behavior. CW- FIT incorporates multiple research-based behavioral strategies including direct instruction of skills, self and peer management, extinction by removing reinforcement (i.e. withholding attention when problem behaviors occur) as well as differential reinforcement of alternative.

EBI Brief for CW-FIT

Train Diversely

Academic or behavior problems may stem from lack of generalization. The student may know the skill but has not learned to generalize it to a new environment. Training and instruction can be adjusted to maximize potential for generalization. Trainers need to cautiously keep the balance between behavior acquisition (learning the behavior) and behavior robustness (how many environments can the trained behavior be used in?) Four ways to alter training in order to facilitate generalization: use sufficient stimulus exemplars, use sufficient response exemplars, make antecedents less discriminable, and make consequences less discriminable.

 

Incorporate Functional Mediators

Academic or behavior problems may stem from lack of generalization. The student may know the skill but has not learned to generalize it to a new environment. This method incorporates teaching with artificial cues (cues that are not naturally used in generalizing environment) which include using physical object cues, social cues, self-regulated physical object cues, and self-regulated verbal cues.

  • Full Intervention Brief: Incorporate Functional Mediators
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    Exploit Functional Contingencies

    Academic or behavior problems may stem from lack of generalization. The student may know the skill but has not learned to generalize it to a new environment. This generalization technique utilizes consequences found naturally in or artificially added to the environment in order to promote generalization of behavior. There are four ways to exploit natural functional contingencies: identify natural consequences, recruit natural consequences, modify maladaptive consequences, and reinforce occurrences of generalization.

  • Full Intervention Brief: Exploit Functional Contingencies
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    Reinforce Natural Occurrences

    Academic problems may stem from lack of generalization. The student may know the skill but has not learned to generalize it to a new environment. When that student naturally shows signs of generalization, reinforce the generalization.

  • Full Intervention Brief: Reinforce Natural Occurrences
  • Modeling Videos: Video 1
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