Project Contributors

Riley-Tillman-Chris_1T. Chris Riley-Tillman received his Ph.D. in School Psychology from Syracuse University. He is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Missouri. In his current position, he provides training in assessment, intervention and consultation. He brings qualifications in the areas of applied behavior analysis, single case design, and the development and validation of assessment and intervention methodologies, which are both empirically supported and feasible. His research interests involve social behavioral assessment, academic assessment/intervention, single case design and consultation. He has authored over 75 articles, book chapters and books. Dr. Riley-Tillman serves as Co-Principal Investigator on Project VIABLE II, an IES-funded grant with goals to develop and evaluate procedures for direct behavior rating scales to effectively and efficiently measure student behavior.

martinezRebecca S. Martinez, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the School Psychology Program at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. A native Spanish speaker, she was raised in Mexico City, Mexico, where she attended elementary school through the third grade. She has taught bilingual fourth grade, third grade, first grade and prekindergarten in the US and has lifetime Texas teaching licenses in bilingual education and early childhood education. Rebecca joined the School Psychology faculty at Indiana University in 2003 and earned tenure in 2009. In 2004, she created the Academic Well-Check Program (AWCP), which is a collaborative partnership with a local school district (RBBCSC) that allows her to conduct empirical research in the public schools and has afforded her graduate students the opportunity to gain applied experiences that bridge the research-to practice-gap in education and school psychology.

lembke photo2, december 2011Dr. Erica Lembke is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Missouri, a trainer for the National Center on Response to Intervention, and president-elect for the national board of the Division for Learning Disabilities. Dr. Lembke has numerous publications in peer-reviewed outlets on the topics of Curriculum-Based Measurement and Response to Intervention, including a recently co-authored book on Tier 2 Interventions. She has presented over 150 national/international and state presentations on these topics. Her research interests include designing and implementing Curriculum-Based Measures in elementary and secondary grades and developing strategies to improve elementary students’ academic performance. She has served as Co-PI on a federally funded Goal 5 IES grant, as well as garnering several smaller subcontracts and institutional grants. Prior to her graduate work, including receiving her PhD from the University of Minnesota, Erica was an elementary special education teacher, working with students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. Dr. Lembke has served as a researcher, teacher, consultant, and faculty member for 20 years in the area of special education.

Dr. Maggin’s is a faculty member at the University of Illinois Chicago.  His research addresses three areas related to the education of students with and at risk for developing emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) including (a) the identification of evidence-based practices through the use of various research synthesis methods, (b) the training of school personnel to use a continuum of effective assessment and intervention methods to identify and treat students with varying behavioral profiles, and (c) the development of school-based methods to ensure that effective interventions are implemented with integrity.

Powell_Sarah_2013_220Dr. Sarah R. Powell is a graduate of the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Sarah is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia. Sarah’s research interests focus on developing and testing interventions for elementary students with mathematics difficulties. Sarah is especially interested in the role of symbols in understanding mathematics and how to use schema to solve word problems. Sarah teaches courses on mathematics instruction in elementary settings, introduction to special education, and teaching students with disabilities. Sarah has also conducted work in the areas of peer learning, progress monitoring, and multi-tiered instruction.

stormont_melissaDr. Melissa Stormont is a professor in special education at MU. Dr. Stormont has published extensive research related to the educational and social needs of young children vulnerable for failure in school, ADHD, and children who are homeless. She has focused the majority of her research efforts on contributing factors to early behavior problems in young children. Dr. Stormont has published more than 65 articles and book chapters related to the needs of children at-risk for failure. She has also written four books on young learners who are at risk for failure. Dr. Stormont is on the editorial boards of Psychology in the Schools, Behavior Disorders, Intervention in School and Clinic, School Psychology Quarterly, and the Journal of Applied School Psychology.  She has an extensive record of work within both the fields of special education and school psychology.  She has published 75 articles, book chapters and books.  Dr. Stormont is a Co-PI with Dr. Reinke on a 2.9 million dollar efficacy trial to evaluate a teacher training program funded by IES.

E.M.Hughes_PictureElizabeth M. Hughes is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University  in Pittsburgh, PA.  She graduated from Clemson University with her doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction with a focus in special education.  Her research interests focus on academic interventions for students with disabilities, including Tier 2 and Tier 3 mathematics interventions.  Current research looks at video-modeling and the concrete-representational-abstract sequence to teach mathematical concepts to students with autism.  She teaches courses on mathematics accommodations and adaptations for elementary and middle school students, systematic observation and assessments, and Response to Intervention and Instruction.

Student Contributors

2012 Project Contributors

  • University of Missouri: Dan Cohen

2010 Project Contributors

  • East Carolina University: Shannon Brooks, Julie Harris, Ashley Noble
  • Indiana University: Ellen Anderson, Avital Deskalo, Susie Galford, Kristen Gerpe, Courtney Lemons, Maryellen McClain, Ashley Schwartz, Kelly Spegel, Megan Trachok, Ashley Visner, Natasha Williams

2009 Project Contributors

  • East Carolina University: Jessica Amon, Amanda Bostian, Ashley Bouknight Wingard, Megan Fox, Lindsey Long, Sarah Raab, Kelly Reigle, Jessica Tomasula
  • Indiana University: Megan Balensiefer, Craig Barnhart, Adrienne Cox, Luke Erichsen, Becky McKinney, Michelle Jochim, Sarah Sparks, Mindy Whalen, Stacy White

2008 Project Contributors

  • East Carolina University: Katie McDuffy, Leigh McCulloch, Jessica Nimocks, Albee Ongsuco, Kate Pearson, Shomara Reyes, Amanda Strickland, Hillary Tunstall

2007 Project Contributors

  • East Carolina University: Holly Beamon, Jacqueline Carrigg, Brynn Grech, Summer Ricketts, Anastasia Scheemaker, Kathryn Weegar

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank several individuals for their inspiration and feedback in the development of this project. Specifically, Chris would like to thank Brian Martens, Tanya Eckert, Vernon Hall and Jim Wright for training and mentorship that lead to this project. We would like to thank Matt Burns and Rachel Brown-Chidsey for their work in modeling interventions via YouTube. Finally, we would like to thank Erin Riley-Tillman, Michael Brown, Sandra Chafouleas, Scott Methe and Christy Walcott for website feedback.